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Into the Tar Pit of Religion

June 3, 2012

Jim Robertson

Well, I touched the hot button of overpopulation without getting burned, so perhaps it's safe to wade into the tar pit of religion without going too far under--

First, a fair warning to lurking hunter trolls: your comments and feeble rationalizations (and we've heard them all before) will not be posted on this blog, but will get filed as such and may be used against you anytime they help prove a point. For example, here's part of a comment I received from a hunter the other day: 'I love animals, but fully understand that all living things have their place in God's plan and on His Earth. He gave us domain over animals. Read Genisis [sic] and wake up!'

How convenient. But do people really still believe that kind of crap?

Sadly, the answer appears to be yes.

A staggering 46% of Americans believe that god created humans in their present form within the past 10,000 years, according to a USA Today/Gallup survey conducted this year from May 10th to the 13th. Not only has that number not changed much in the past 30 years since Gallup first asked the question on Creationism vs Evolution, it's actually gone up 2%, from 44% in 1982 to 46% in 2012!

Gallup's Frank Newport told CNN, 'Despite the many changes that have taken place in American society and culture over the past 30 years, including new discoveries in biological and social science, there has been virtually no sustained change in Americans' views of the origins of the human species since 1982. All in all, there's no evidence in this trend of a substantial movement toward a secular viewpoint on human origins.'

So, why do I care what people believe? Why won't I just let them have their fun?

Because such dogma can directly affect how non-humans are treated.

The literal belief that humans have some kind of god-given authority over every other species of animal bestows undeserved power into unreliable hands. Creationist claptrap that favors one species over another perpetuates speciesist doctrine devised to demean and control our fellow animals in the same way that notions of racial superiority were used against our fellow humans.

The second most common view of those polled--held by 32% of respondents--is that humans evolved with god's guidance. Again, a very convenient conviction that can be used to put humans on top.

Newport goes on to say, 'It would be hard to dispute that most scientists who study humans agree that the species evolved over millions of years, and that relatively few scientists believe that humans began in their current form only 10,000 years ago without the benefit of evolution. Thus, almost half of Americans hold a belief [in creationism] that is at odds with the preponderance of scientific literature.'

To their benefit, and to the detriment of every other living thing on the planet, I might add.

Wildlife Photography Copyright Jim Robertson



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