Practical Issues > Hunting / Fishing > Hunting - Index

NEWS DIGEST: 07.01.02-2

1. (US) Kalkaska man convicted of harassing other hunters

2. (US) Black bears timid, according to expert

3. US ) SPCA plan taps area vets' services

4. US ) A fourth dog rescued from alleged mill dies

5. US ) HI: lawsuit filed in Hawaii to protect turtles

6. (US) Tame the dialogue on animal rights

7. South Korea to toughen law to protect animals from abuse

8. (US) Food industry backs animal welfare rules

9. US ) Agendas behind people who kill whales are suspect

10. (US) Bull's Genes Could Speed Changes To Feed Millions Around the World


1. (US) Kalkaska man convicted of harassing other hunters

KALKASKA, Mich. (AP) -- A Kalkaska hunter was convicted of violating a law intended to keep animal rights advocates from harassing hunters. 

Virgil Jason Deater, 81, of Kalkaska, was convicted by a jury Thursday on one count of interfering with another person's hunt. He was acquitted of another count of the same charge. 


2. (US) Black bears timid, according to expert

The Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals recently planned two Massachusetts talks on black bears. They were to happen in Northampton and Amherst .

Then last week came news that a Worcester police officer shot and killed a black bear that was sitting 25 feet up in a tree in a residential neighborhood. The shooting was ordered while a state environmental police officer apparently was on the way to assess the situation.

full story: http://www.telegram.com/news/valley/bearb.html 


3. US ) SPCA plan taps area vets' services

Owners would get pet after spaying, neutering

NEWPORT NEWS --  The Peninsula SPCA's executive director said this week that he's working on a plan to send thousands of adopted dogs and cats a year to a half-dozen or so local veterinarians to be spayed or neutered before the animals are sent home with new families.

Gene Falls ' initial idea was to give the business to two practices, Boulevard Animal Hospital in Newport News and the Peninsula Cat Hospital in York County . But he said he expected many other local vets to be upset because they would lose business. That's because vets who spay and neuter cats and dogs adopted from the SPCA often establish relationships with the owners and continue to treat the pets.


4. US ) A fourth dog rescued from alleged mill dies

Another of the nearly two dozen sickly dogs that Clackamas County sheriff's deputies recently seized from an alleged puppy mill operator has died, bringing the total number of dead dogs to four.

All but one of the 19 survivors have been assigned to foster-care homes, said Barbara Baugnon, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Humane Society. The other survivor remains in an emergency veterinary clinic, where it is receiving care.

full story: http://www.oregonlive.com/metrosouth/oregonian/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/metro_south_news/1025351779197272.xml


5. US ) HI: lawsuit filed in Hawaii to protect turtles

Friday, June 28, 2002

http://starbulletin.com/2002/06/28/news/index12.html

Fishing tests threaten turtles, suit says

3 groups want the court to stop ongoing longline experiments

By Diana Leone dleone@starbulletin.com 

Environmental groups filed a lawsuit yesterday alleging that National  Marine Fisheries Service-approved longline fishing experiments now under way  will cause unacceptable harm to endangered sea turtles.

Under a special permit issued in January, a small number of longliners tar geting swordfish will be allowed to kill up to six green sea  turtles, 15 leatherback sea turtles and 87 loggerhead turtles in the course of determining whether experimental fishing methods could ultimately  reduce accidental catch of turtles, the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit, filed by the Ocean Conservancy, the Turtle Island  Restoration Network and the Center for Biological Diversity, asks the court to find  the fisheries service in violation of the Endangered Species Act and  related federal laws.

"Our position is that the turtles are already so close to extinction  that even this experiment is not permissible under the Endangered Species  Act," said Paul Achitoff, the Hawaii EarthJustice attorney handling the case.

Achitoff said he will be asking the court to stop the experiments.

No more than 3,000 leatherback turtles remain in the Pacific, down from 100,000 about 20 years ago, said Brendan Cummings, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity in Berkeley , Calif.

Scientists say the rare creatures, which can get as large as a  Volkswagen Bug, could go extinct in 10 years without more protection.

Sean Martin, president of the Hawaii Longline Association, said it's  "not surprising" that environmental groups have again filed a lawsuit that affects the longline fishing industry, which he said is "very anxious  to conduct experiments that will reduce interactions on all protected  species.

"If we are not allowed to conduct the experiments, the fishery would be  in jeopardy," Martin said.

Longlining for swordfish by Hawaii-based vessels was banned by federal  court order in April 2001, based on evidence that shallow-set hooks for  swordfish are more likely to catch turtles than the deeper-set hooks for tuna.

The fishing experiments approved by the fisheries service test a  variety of methods to prevent turtles from getting hooked by longliners fishing  for swordfish.


6. (US) Tame the dialogue on animal rights

[Christian Science Monitor op/ed -- seemingly written as though AR2002 already happened?]

During a recent trip to the supermarket, my eye was drawn to a  fluorescent yellow sticker that someone had stuck to a chicken. "Caution!" it read, "This package contains the decomposing corpse of a small tortured  animal."

How was I to react? Perhaps grateful that someone had finally explained  to me what that lean juicy stuff labeled "chicken" actually is. Or perhaps with such an overwhelming sense of shame at my intentions that I would  put it back on the shelf.

Instead, I rolled my eyes, dropped it into the cart, and moved on.

The nation's largest annual conference on animal rights took place in Washington last weekend. Its participants should be congratulated for  their one major success: Over the past 20 years, they have alerted the public  to the issue of animal welfare.

full story: http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0701/p08s03-coop.html 


7. South Korea to toughen law to protect animals from abuse

The Korean government is seeking to pass a law that would strengthen  the current animal protection act, in order to prevent inhumane treatment  of animals, officials said yesterday.

"It may be nonsense that foreigners criticize Koreans eating habits in light of cultural relativism," said an official, citing overseas  criticism of the custom of eating dog meat in Korea . "But slaughtering dogs in an inhumane way is a matter of serious concern."


8. (US) Food industry backs animal welfare rules

WASHINGTON , June 28 (UPI) -- Supermarkets and fast food chains are adopting more humane treatment of the animals that eventually find their way into America 's shopping carts or between sesame-seed buns.

The latest indication of this trend toward kinder, gentler treatment for cows, pigs and chickens comes in a report from a joint committee of two trade organizations representing supermarkets and chain restaurants across the United States . The Food Marketing Industry and the National Council of Chain Restaurants report their new Farmed Animals Welfare Guidelines call for larger pens for cows and pigs, better veterinary care for animals and cleaner coops for egg-laying chickens.


9. US ) Agendas behind people who kill whales are suspect

[Anchorage Daily News op/ed]

A dead whale is a dead whale. It doesn't care who killed it or why or for what reasons. All it knows is that it is dead.

Given that, it has been more than a little disconcerting to listen to the political spin that has come in the wake of a decision by the International Whaling Commission to ban Alaska Natives from hunting bowhead whales.

full story: http://www.adn.com/outdoors/story/1341006p-1459833c.html 


10. (US) Bull's Genes Could Speed Changes To Feed Millions Around the World

On the day he first opened his eyes in a birthing stall 50 miles west  of Washington, Round Oak Rag Apple Elevation was just another soggy,  wobbly calf hungry for mother's milk.

That was before his good timing, great genes and eager handlers turned Elevation into a global breeding phenomenon with more than 80,000  daughters and at least 2.3 million granddaughters, making him the most  influential bull ever born.